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Creating next level content with your event.

We all want our events to create good content, and get talked about, and shared on the internet. But how does that happen? What does good event content really look like? What does it sound like? And how can we actually make good content if we just have Zoom and our laptop cameras? To answer these questions, we took a look at a few recent events, and came up with a checklist on how to create some really great event content. Just don’t forget to hit record!

Create backgrounds that your audience will appreciate

During The NAMM 2021 Kramer Guitar panel, with guitarists Snake Sabo, Charlie Parra, Tracii Guns, and Mark Agnesi, 3 of the 4 panelists had a wall of music gear in their background. Each panelist had their own way of displaying guitars, amps, recording equipment, and memorabilia from their careers. In addition to looking cool, this gave the audience a window into their personality, and in a way, made the event feel more real — almost like reality TV. It’s easy for organizers to stress about how to make an event more real, and make a big production of it with better cameras and stages. But sometimes the best visuals you can add are at home. Especially if you’re a rockstar!

Work with creators! (Sounds obvious, we know.)

For the 2020 Vans Triple Crown of Surfing, surfers from around the world were encouraged to submit their own footage of their best waves from three different spots in Hawaii. The contest ran for four weeks (December 21 – January 18), and then concluded with a virtual awards ceremony where the hosts showed the best waves and talked to the winning surfers. It’s no secret that surfers make good content — they are content making machines — and that’s really the point. If you want to guarantee that your event makes good content, you have to work with people that do it on a regular basis. Work with people that can bring in views, and who specialize in reaching a large audience. You might even get to hit the beach for a little while!

Work with your audience to shape the content.

The KCRW “This Album Saved My Teenage Years” event included KCRW DJs, past and present, telling stories alongside listeners about favorite albums from the past. Anyone could hop on the call and talk about their favorite records from when they were younger with people who know a lot about records — DJs. We liked that it wasn’t really a presentation or panel. It was more like a get together at a radio station, or a local bar, or venue, just to chat about music. The event also gave people who are not necessarily music professionals or DJs, a chance to help shape KCRW’s content. As much as content is about sharing something you made, it’s also about giving other people in your community an opportunity share. And everyone a good story about their favorite song from their teenage years!

Make something that is on-brand.

For the ASUS #BeAhead virtual launch event, Asus put together a very technologically advanced, and visually stunning event that perfectly matched their brand and products. The video included studio quality advertisements for each product launch, as well as multiple keynote style addresses on various soundstages. This is a good example of creating an event that doubles as a marketing experience. Almost every scene was GIF and instagram ready, and more importantly, the event represented the tech that ASUS was selling. But don’t worry, not all organizers have to create an event with this much production. It’s just about doing something that matches your message. We do like the look of those crates and TVs on the ASUS soundstage though.

Use music to make people happy.

Alicia’s Keys’ virtual Soulcare event combined live performance, spoken word, and webcam interviews to talk about selfcare, music, and communication. The different performance styles from Keys, and the interviews with her guests, all worked perfectly together to create a relaxing, almost meditative experience. We really like that this event felt like an escape, almost like a journey through sound and conversation. Especially Keys’ singing and spoken work portions. It’s easy to get caught up in how something should look, but this event proves that the audio experience, and the good feelings that it can create, are just as important.

Put some cats in the content. 

We would be remiss if we didn’t mention the Lawyer Kitten, who took the internet by storm recently. If you haven’t seen this amazing piece of content, here’s what happened… A lawyer from Texas signed into his Zoom court hearing with his face obscured by a kitten camera filter. The eyes, head, and mouth of the kitten moved as the lawyer talked to the judge. At one point the lawyer states for the record that he is, in fact, “not a cat.” The only real reaction to what was on a screen was a quick laugh from the man in the upper right. There’s probably a deeper meaning to why this is so funny, but we keep going back to the cat. Without a kitten it’s not the same. Cats, dogs, and anything with fur, they are the real kings of content. And we stand by that claim! 

It’s all about what you like to watch

The best content is the content that you like to watch. It comes down to the people you want to watch it, the backgrounds you find interesting, and the different ideas that are expressed. Good content can be a lawyer with a cat filter. It can also be an artist creating conversation with their guests. The most important thing is that you like it.

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